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Quick Hit Profiles: DL

We continue with our quick hit profiles, this time with the D-line.

FRANK ALEXANDER, DE, OKLAHOMA

Mike Mayock likes Frank Alexander, so I’ll let him talk:

Mayock: “He’s not so much a sleeper as he is undervalued. He’s 270 pounds with long arms and a good motor. He played for a big-time team in a big-time conference. But all I’m hearing are constant sixth-round grades on the guy, and I think he’s better than that. He doesn’t have incredible athletic ability. But he’s got the arms and the frame and the great motor. I think somebody’s going to get a starting-quality defensive end in the fifth round.’’

JAMIE BLATNICK, DE, OKLAHOMA STATE

Tough, effort guy. Strong, but small. Will make plays on effort alone.

JOSH CHAPMAN, DT, ALABAMA

Wide bodied nose who is short (just under 6-1). Two down run stopper. Might be better in a 34.

JACK CRAWFORD, DE, PENN STATE

Born in London. Good size. Smart. Still raw, but has athletic ability to mold.

TYRONE CRAWFORD, DE, BOISE STATE

Canadian born prospect played all over the line at Boise. Plays hard, good size and is strong. Not a lot of natural talent, but a hard worker who will make plays on effort alone.

JARED CRICK, DE/DT, NEBRASKA:

I’ll let Doug Farrar of Shutdown Corner do the talking:

Conclusion: The more I watch Crick, the more I’m convinced that his best NFL role would be as a run-stopping four-front hybrid end who could also move inside on obvious passing downs. I don’t project him as a starting 3-4 end — while he does have the prototypical size to fill that role, he doesn’t yet have the ability to deal with double teams that the inside end position requires. What he does have is the positional versatility in high demand as the NFL moves to a point in which the line between straight 3-4 and 4-3 defenses has basically dissolved. While his sack numbers without Suh in the picture were impressive, I think he’ll struggle a bit at first against better blocking. Two things will serve Crick very well in the NFL — more pure upper-body strength, and a developed palette of advanced pass-rush moves. There is absolutely no question about Crick’s work ethic, and it’s very possible that my scouting report of Crick would have far fewer negatives if he had enjoyed a full 2011 season. He’s probably reached his ceiling from a speed perspective, which leaves technique as the tie-breaker.

VINNY CURRY, DE, MARSHALL

Doug Farrar, once again:

Because of his speed and gap versatility at the college level, some may try to buy into Curry as a pure 3-4 outside linebacker, but he’s really a pass-rushing specialist with impressive run-defending ability. He’s not going to drop into coverage at an expert level without a lot of work, but expecting him to do that would like asking a Lamborghini to tow a U-Haul trailer. His one scheme-transcendent asset — demon speed off the edge — should translate very well to the NFL.

Where Curry can separate himself from the college speed ends who wash out in the pros is in his ability to develop technique around his raw tools. There’s evidence of this when switching from his 2010 to 2011 tape. He’s now more of a read-and-react player, and if he can augment this new patience with the kinds of moves that work at the professional level, he’s got what it takes to be one of the NFL’s more feared pass-rushers. Curry would be best-utilized in a four-man or hybrid front in which he plays outside, especially in conjunction with a defensive tackle good enough to soak up blockers and let him wreak havoc.

Like Pierre-Paul, who went to the Giants with the 15th overall pick in 2010 despite limited college experience, Curry could surprise with his draft position — he’s projected by most as a player worthy of a top-second-round selection, but it will only take one defensive coordinator falling in love with the speed on tape to change that.

MIKE DANIELS, DT, IOWA

Under 6-1, he’s too small to be a starter. Explosive. Athletic.Fits best as a nickel 3 technique, who can get after the passer.

HEBRON “LONI” FANGUPO, DT, BYU

Small but thick, Fangupo is very strong. Run suffer

JUSTIN FRANCIS, DE/DT, RUTGERS

Francis has long arms and had good explosion. On the smaller side. Seems to fit best as a backup end who could slide inside on 3rd downs.

TREVOR GUYTON, DE, CALIFORNIA

Strong and physical. Effort player. Can play all along the line. Could be versatile and valuable backip.

AKIEM HICKS, DT, REGINA

LSU recruit but declared ineligible due to recruiting violations. Found his way to Canada. Great size. Athletic. Very raw. Practice squad candidate with upside.

BRUCE IRVIN, DE/OLB, WEST VIRGINIA

One of our draft crushes:

Bruce Irvin has an interesting story. Dropped out of high school. Spent some time on the streets. Eventually decided to make something of himself. Got his GED. Went to a community college and in his first season as a pass rusher had 16 sacks. He is explosive. Very explosive. Great first step. He is agile, and he can bend around the edge. He’s not a full time starter, as he’s only 245 pounds, and will not fare well against the run. But on 3rd downs, there is a lot this guy can do. Can stand up. Can play in a “wide nine” alignment”. Can stunt and loop inside. You’re talking a double digit sack guy on third downs. The Giants love pass rushers, and while Irvin is one-dimensional, his one dimension is pretty good. The best pure rusher in the draft. Perry Fewell (or any coordinator that gets Irvin) is going to have a field day figuring out ways to use him.

CAM JOHNSON, DE/OLB, VIRGINIA

Versatile defender in the Mathias Kiwanuka mold, Johnson has experience at end and linebacker.

MARKUS KUHN, DT, NC STATE

German born defensive tackle has good size and can move. More of a run stopper.

VAUGHN MEATOGA, DT, HAWAII

Decent sized tackle who can play some snaps against the run.

JULIAN MILLER, DE, WEST VIRGINIA

Try hard defensive end prospect who was productive in college.

DONTE PAIGE-MOSS, DE, NORTH CAROLINA

Paige-Moss has all the physical tools, but has struggled with injuries and maturity

MICANOR REGIS, DT, MIAMI (FL)

Good quickness and has potential as a penetrating 3 technique.

JACQUIES SMITH, DE/OLB, MISSOURI

Good burst, but lacks bulk to stay at defensive end. Some upside as a nickel rusher.

SCOTT SOLOMON, DE, RICE

Hard worker, who is a DE/LB tweener. Could get by on effort.

BRANDON THOMPSON, DT, CLEMSON

Explosive, stout tackle who occupies blockers. Great run stopper, and has burst to improve pass rush.

DEREK WOLFE, DT, CINCINNATI

Good size, effort and quickness. Needs to bulk up. Could fit better as a 5-technique.

PREVIOUS QUICK HIT PROFILES:

QB

RB

WR/TE

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4 Responses to “Quick Hit Profiles: DL”

  1. Chris says:

    I am not in love with any player in this years draft except for Luke Kuechly. Why not use our first, third and osi to go get him if he drops to Seattle at 12. I know it ridiculous to talk about but Osi is dispensable. Kiwi could be our third DE, and be just as lethal. Reese has drafted well enough and signed veterans so i do not see any areas that need depth or competition. At the end of the day Reese is amazing and what ever he does i have nothing but faith.

    • Jason C. says:

      I wouldn’t even assume that Kuechly goes that high, this draft will be unpredictable, and if they do love him as much as you do, they’ll have to hope he slips into the early-mid 20’s if they’re going to make a move, no way they move up to 12, you just can’t without giving up multiple first round picks.

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